Blog Archives

ASU Downtown Phoenix Hosting “Have a HeArt” Benefit on Feb 25

[Source: Downtown Phoenix Journal]

Have a HeArt for NP Healthcare Clinics

ASU’s College of Nursing & Health Innovation will host the inaugural “Have a HeArt” benefit on Friday, February 25 from 6 to 9 p.m. to help fund the university’s four nonprofit clinics around the Valley, collectively known as NP Healthcare.

The benefit, featuring heart-healthy food and drink, live entertainment and silent auction prizes, also aims to educate guests about the clinics and how they can be utilized as part of a healthy lifestyle.

ASU's College of Nursing & Health Innovation. Photograph by Yuri Artibise.

“Most people think of our health clinics are just for students but our services are available to the entire community,” said Debra Vincent, community liaison for ASU’s Clinical Practice and Community Partnerships. “We offer accessible and affordable healthcare in a professional setting.”

On-site nutritional analysis and advice on what food to keep your heart healthy and to fight specific diseases will be offered as well as tours of the 4,000-square-foot health center at ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus.

Attendees will discover that “heart-healthy food” doesn’t mean “boring” or “carrots and celery sticks.” Quite the contrary, as evidenced by the menu below, provided by Tiffany Skall A-List Corporate Events & Catering:

  • Chicken, beef and shrimp satay
  • Smoked salmon bruschetta
  • Mashed potatoes with lobster butter, blue cheese butter, truffle butter, prosciutto, sour cream, cheddar feta and chives
  • Tarragon-braised beef tips with root vegetables, whipped cauliflower and onion straws
  • Domestic and imported cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, nuts, dips, artisinal breads, lavosh and crostini
  • Build-your-own lettuce wraps with spicy chicken, roasted root vegetables and beef
  • Assortment of low-calorie cakes, pies and tarts

Silent auction prizes feature exceptional works from local artists, including photography by Marilyn Szabo and jewelry by Heidi Abrahamson. Goods and services from noted local businesses, from the Clarendon Hotel, to the Phoenix Art Museum and many others, are also up for grabs.

The NP Healthcare provider staff includes practitioners who specialize in family practice and behavioral/mental healthcare. Services include men and women’s health exams, counseling and mental healthcare, minor illness care, prescriptions for medications, chronic disease management, family planning, healthy lifestyles education, stress management, tobacco cessation, nutrition advice, on-site EKG, sexually transmitted infection testing/treatment and referrals to other medical and health services.

Patients can use their health insurance to pay for services as well as cash, credit card, Sun Card or have their student account charged for the cost of the services. For employers, the NP Care members enjoy access to quality and accessible basic health services for a fixed office visit fee and discounts on tests performed at outside labs.

Tickets for the event start at just $25. Purchase online here.

The ASU College of Nursing & Health Innovation is located at 500 N. 3rd St. on the ASU Downtown campus (light rail at Central Station).

 

Phoenix Art Museum’s Third Annual Walkabout on Sunday!

[Source: Phoenix Art Museum]

Walkabout is an exciting celebration of local traditions, national customs and global cultures that showcases the Museum’s international collection of art. Inside the Museum, visitors enjoy live performances by storytellers, artists and musicians that reflect the works on view. Outside, the Valley’s most diverse performers and restaurants present the sights, sounds and smells of several continents.

From hands-on, kid-friendly activities to samples of traditional dishes and a dazzling array of entertainers, Walkabout offers the whole family an amazing cultural experience!

Click here for images of Walkabout 2010

Walkabout 2011

January 30, Noon – 5pm

12 – 5pm “Ask me Docents” (South Wing Galleries), Ikebana of Arizona, Japanese flower arrangements (Asian Art Gallery), Food sampling from local ethnic restaurants (Sculpture Garden), Artist demonstrations (Wilde Plaza), Henna Tattoos (Sculpture Garden)

12pm Gamelan Orchestra presented by the MIM (Great Hall), Wild West Stick Ponies (Children’s Activity)

12:30pm Top Hats (Children’s Activity), The Art of Ikebana demonstration (Asian Art Gallery), Phoenix Theater actors bring portraits to life (European and American Art Galleries), Taiko drums, Japanese sanshin and guitar (Sculpture Garden)

1pm Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian rhythms with Bata Ire (Katz Main)

1:30pm Gamelan Orchestra presented by the MIM (Great Hall), Kawambe-Omowale African Drum and Dance Theatre (Sculpture Garden)

2pm Chinese Brush Painting (Hands-On Demonstration), Music for Royalty, Performance by the Four Seasons Orchestra (European Art Gallery), Phoenix Theater actors bring portraits to life (European and American Art Galleries)

2:30pm The Art of Ikebana demonstration (Asian Art Gallery), Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian rhythms with Bata Ire (Katz Main), Flamenco performance (Sculpture Garden)

3pm Fiddle and guitar performance by Peter Rolland (Western American Art Gallery)

3:30pm Music for Royalty, Performance by the Four Seasons Orchestra (European Art Gallery), Phoenix Theater actors bring portraits to life (European and American Art Galleries), Music of North India and Afghanistan (Sculpture Garden)

4pm Fiddle and guitar performance by Peter Rolland (Western American Art Gallery), Capoeira performance (Wilde Plaza)

4:15pm Poranguí & Zang, a fusion of African, Brazilian & Middle Eastern songs (Sculpture Garden)

All Walkabout performances and activities are included with Museum general admission, which is $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens (65+), $8 for full-time college students with ID, $4 for children ages 6-17 and free for children under 6. Free for Museum Members.

Best of Downtown Phoenix

This week, the Phoenix New Times came out with their annual Best of Phoenix 2010 list.  Among the 583 winners, there were several in and around downtown Phoenix.

Here’s a list:

People & Places

La Vida

Shopping & Services

Food & Drink

Bars & Clubs

Hero Worship

Be sure to also check out the ‘Hero’s and Villains‘ slideshow, features some of downtown’s best—and worst—personalities!

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MALLS R US returns Feb. 28, Phoenix Art Museum

MALLS R US: A contemplative investigation on mall culture and effect by Helene Klodawsky

  • Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010
  • Time: 1 p.m. (doors at 12:30 p.m.)
  • Place: Whiteman Hall, Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Ave., Phoenix AZ 85004
  • Free Admission (ask for pass at front desk)
  • Film introduction by Kimber Lanning, Director, Local First Arizona

MALLS R US discusses the psychological appeal of malls to consumers, how architects design their environments to combine consumerism with nature and spectacle, how suburban shopping centers impart social values, and how malls are transforming the traditional notions of community, social space and human interaction.

As entertaining as it is informative, MALLS R US offers a trip to the mall like no other, reveling in their architectural splendor as consumerist paradises but also showing how the social dynamism they represent can be a destructive force, one that confuses the good life with the world of goods.  And yes Arizona, you will recognize several local sites.

Co-presented by No Festival Required; sponsored by CityCircles

The gravity of downtown Phoenix

[Forwarded by Dan Semenchuk at Creative Connect] — Gravity was shot in HD with a Canon 5D MKII in and around downtown Phoenix, using available light and features the memorable spaces that dot the Phoenician landscape, including the months’ old light rail system, Civic Space Park, Phoenix Art Museum, and Clarendon Hotel.  The project is the second collaboration for the band and photographer after shooting their album cover.  For this project, the lyrics and visuals work in chorus, using the metaphor of gravity to illustrate the isolation, anonymity and stresses of modern city living.

7 healthy signs for the metro Phoenix arts scene

[Source: Kerry Lengel, Arizona Republic] — There’s no point in soft-pedaling it: The great financial panic of 2008-09 sent Valley arts organizations into a tailspin.  Cautious consumers sat on their wallets instead of opening them up at the box office, and big corporations had less cash to send trickling down to the non-profits.  So performing companies canceled shows, slashed production budgets and cut staff.  MyArtsCommunity.org, a high-profile campaign to raise donations, fell flat.  The latest bad news comes from the West Valley, where the Heard Museum plans to shutter its satellite gallery and the West Valley Art Museum has closed its doors while scrambling to raise $150,000 to keep it afloat.

With the 2009-10 season revving up this month, anxiety about ticket sales and charitable giving remains high.  But the show must go on, and there are hundreds of dedicated individuals, in the spotlight and behind the scenes, who are working to make sure that the crisis doesn’t spin into an arts apocalypse.  To counter the gloom and doom, here are seven reasons to be optimistic about the state of the arts:

  1. Up-and-coming companies: Arizona Opera and Ballet Arizona remain strong, but they are no longer the only game in town.  The upstart Phoenix Opera has brought in top-notch singers for two years of traditionalist stagings, while Novaballet, entering its second season, is committed to cutting-edge choreography that brings dance into the 21st century.
  2. New works: For theaters, the temptation might be to rely on familiar titles to fill seats.  Yes, there’s a bit of that in the coming season.  But in addition to the return of “The Phantom of the Opera,” ASU Gammage is bringing in-the-now Broadway hits “In the Heights” and “August: Osage County” (last year’s Tony winners for best musical and best play, respectively).  Actors Theatre has four Arizona premieres on the bill, while Arizona Theatre Company will be staging a new adaptation of “The Kite Runner” and commissioning a world-premiere comedy, “The Second City Does Arizona.”
  3. Investments in venues: The building boom that gave us new performing-arts venues in Mesa, Tempe and Peoria isn’t over.  The Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts and the Herberger Theater Center are undergoing extensive renovations, while future projects, including an expansion at Phoenix Theatre, are in the works.  The economic downturn is sure to slow the pace of big capital projects, but the momentum hasn’t been lost.
  4. Fresh blood: The Scottsdale center’s rebuilt theater comes with a new artistic director, Jeffrey Babcock, who promises to reach out to a broader audience with splashy events, such as its first Festival of Latin Jazz & Culture.  New leadership always presents an opportunity to rethink ways of doing things, which means we could soon be seeing innovative programming at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, ASU Art Museum and Heard Museum: All are on the lookout to fill director positions this year.
  5. Experienced leaders: Shaking things up can be good, but there’s also something to be said for a steady hand on the tiller.  That’s what many major companies have: savvy executives with track records for success.  At the Phoenix Art Museum, Jim Ballinger has been in charge since 1972, growing it into a multimillion-dollar company that attracts well over 200,000 visitors a year and overseeing two major expansions.  On the artistic side are such leaders as Ballet Arizona’s Ib Andersen, a Balanchine protege who in 10 years has elevated the company to one of the most respected ballets in the country.
  6. International networking: The arts community forms a web that crosses all borders, and some of the greatest performers in the world are Arizona-bound this season.  There’s the incomparable cellist Yo-Yo Ma, of course, at the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, which also will host top dance troupes, including the pioneering Paul Taylor and Martha Graham companies.  Then there’s the conducting world’s biggest superstar, the charismatic Venezuelan Gustavo Dudamel, who will bring the Los Angeles Philharmonic to Phoenix’s Symphony Hall for a performance that’s sure to be a highlight of the season.
  7. Grass roots: Even if the unthinkable happened and every major company in the Valley were forced to close, that would not be the end of the arts.  There will always be actors and singers and dancers, and art lovers who want to see them.  In good times and in bad, every generation breeds a crop of optimistic entrepreneurs who aren’t satisfied with how everybody else does things.  Just one example is Chyro Arts Venue, which opened last year in south Scottsdale and offers provocative, independent-minded theater without the benefit of a six-figure budget.  Many such companies come and go, but some will thrive and move to the next level, becoming the Nearly Naked Theatres and Center Dance Ensembles of tomorrow. The future is always unwritten.  [Note: Read the full article at 7 healthy signs for the metro Phoenix arts scene.]

Cities x Design made quick stop to Phoenix this weekend

Cities x Design is a 35-city trans-media research trip across the United States that is recorded online and will later be released in film, exhibition, and book form.  Their fifth stop was Phoenix.  Visit their website to learn more about their trip, express your opinion on your favorite metro Phoenix sites, and view pictures of places they visited here and along the way to their next stop, San Diego.

March proclaimed “Phoenix Arts Month”

Every weekend during the month of March, arts events will be hosted in downtown Phoenix and surrounding neighborhoods, along with events, exhibitions, and performances on other days throughout the month.  In recognition of the local arts community and these public festivals, Mayor Phil Gordon has proclaimed March as “Phoenix Arts Month” and invites everyone to attend and celebrate.

  • March 7-8, Art Detour: The city’s First Fridays art walk of local galleries and art spaces organized by Art Link.  Free shuttles run beginning at Phoenix Center for the Arts, and take guests to destinations throughout downtown Phoenix.
  • March 7-8, Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market: One of the nation’s most acclaimed gathering of Native American artists. 
  • March 12-15, West of Western Culinary Festival: Celebrating Arizona’s chefs and culinary arts at the Phoenix Art Museum
  • March 15, Phoenix Art Museum: Spring exhibition “In Contemporary Rhythm” opens.
  • March 21-22, Valley Fever Art Festival: Phoenix’s newest festival celebrating visual and performing arts, including music, dance, poetry, theater, street painting, and more at Heritage Square.
  • March 28-29, Phoenix Fringe Festival: Innovative, experimental and provocative theater by local, national, and international artists.

For a full calendar of events during the month of March, click here.

Phoenix arts advocates scramble to protect at-risk groups

[Source: Arizona Citizens for the Arts] — Phoenix arts advocates, like supporters of numerous other programs facing the spectre of significant budget cuts, have expressed concern for the following programs “on the chopping block:”

Pueblo Grande Museum is facing proposed reductions including elimination of a museum curator, museum assistant, two museum aides, a secretary and a semi-skilled worker.  Special events, summer programs and lectures will be reduced by 50 percent; and school tours will no longer be available, and maintenance of landscaping and surrounding grounds will be reduced.

The Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture grants budget of $890,000 will be cut by 50-75% or more. These grants along with grants from the state arts commission are typically the only source of unrestricted funds these organizations receive and have been the only source of stable funding they could count on for years to help provide affordable programs to the community.  The city’s grants budget over the last 20 years has never been lower than $460,000.  These reductions will take us well below that number — and with the growth of the city population and inflation over these 20 years, the support given to arts organizations will be dismal, at best. (Imagine how long it would take to rebuild to the current level of support.)

The Heard Museum, which relies heavily on sales made at its famous gift shop has seen a significant reduction in sales, forcing huge budget cuts and program reductions mid-year.

The Shemer Arts Center, a community arts center and Phoenix Point of Pride, is facing closure.

The Phoenix Center for the Arts, an affordable arts education facility, serving local emerging artists and arts organizations and located in the heart of the city is facing budget cut of 70%, essentially shutting down most of its programs serving students and artists.

Many large and small arts organizations have begun staff reductions and layoffs including the Phoenix Art Museum, the Phoenix Symphony, Ballet Arizona, and Free Arts of Arizona which serves young children, among others.

Due to these drastic budget shortfalls, grant guidelines have been rewritten at the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.  These will result in elimination of funding to any organization that is not producing arts or located within the city will be cut.  Organizations who’ll see no further grants from Phoenix include Free Arts of Arizona, Herberger Theater Center, Boys and Girls Clubs, Habilitation Center, Artability, Childsplay, and local arts agencies such as the North Valley Arts Council and the West Valley Fine Arts Council.  [Note: For more information from the Arizona Citizens for the Arts, click here.  For City of Phoenix budget hearing information, click here.  For related Arizona Republic article, click here.]

On Dec. 27 in downtown Phoenix, visit Light Rail Stop #11