Category Archives: Education

An evening of “Urban Is” with Vital Voices

Vital Voices Urban eventConsider coming to support Vital Voices as we explore “Urban is” with Bboy House at the Cyphers Center for Urban Arts, Thursday, August 15.  The Herberger Institute’s Socially Engaged Practice is teaming up with Project Humanities this year to help design these participatory, thought-provoking evenings of community dialogue.

Events are free and refreshments are provided.

Phoenix Biomedical Campus Community Town Hall, May 29

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ASU Lifelong Learning Institute Launches

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute logoWant a sample of what the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will offer in the downtown Phoenix campus? Everyone is welcome on January 12, 2:00 to 4:00, to hear from three scholars.

More detail is here.

RSVP to this free event by January 9, 2013 to 602-543-6440.

Bill of Rights Monument Dedicated in Phoenix, Supported by DVC

9th Amendment monolith, one of 10 limestone carvings commemorating the Bill of Rights, located in Wesley Bolin Plaza, Phoenix, Ariz.  (photo: Jim McPherson)

9th Amendment monolith, one of 10 limestone carvings commemorating the Bill of Rights, located in Wesley Bolin Plaza, Phoenix, Ariz. (photo: Jim McPherson)

Here’s a great shot by Jim McPherson of one of the 10 monuments to the Bill of Rights, dedicated in December in the Wesley Bolin Plaza in Phoenix.

Downtown Voices Coalition is proud to have been an early supporter of this project, the first in the nation. Read more about this accomplishment (and see more photos) here.

NEW Lifelong Learning Program at @asudpc ASU Downtown Phoenix Campus

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at ASU

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at ASU is pleased to announce the opening of a new Downtown Phoenix campus program. The “A Taste of OLLI” grand launch will take place on Jan. 12 at the Cronkite Theatre in the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism Building. The OLLI program provides short courses and lectures for participants ages 50 + at a nominal cost. Courses will be held at the ASU Downtown Phoenix campus with most courses running four sessions.

All spring courses or lectures are taught by ASU professors, or emeritus professors in the fields of history, science, public health and current events. This will be a wonderful opportunity for residents of the Phoenix inner city area to be a part of the ASU community with courses designed specifically for them.

Among the course titles for the spring are: “History Detectives,” “Children and Adolescents within U.S. Culture and the Legal System,” and titles of some of the lectures are “The First 100 Years of Quantum Physics,” and “Crime, Violence and Public Health.”

The Spring Schedule will be available online in mid-December and available in print form after Jan. 1, 2013. Call Shirley Talley at 602 496-1191 or go here for more information or to register for classes.

Local experts and national author to discuss state of sustainability in metro Phoenix, Jan. 17

A panel of local experts and Andrew Ross, author of “Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City,” will discuss the current state of sustainability in metropolitan Phoenix at a public forum on Tuesday, January 17, 2012.  The event, free to the public, will be held at the George Washington Carver Museum & Cultural Center at 415 E. Grant Street. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., panel discussion 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., audience Q&A 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., and reception with complimentary refreshments 8 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Panel moderator will be Charles Redman, Arizona State University (ASU) Virginia M. Ullmann professor of Natural History and the Environment and founding director of the ASU School of Sustainability. The current slate of panelists (with two to be added soon) includes:

  • Maria Baier, state land commissioner, Arizona;
  • Steve Betts, former president/CEO of SunCor Development and current Arizona District Council Chair of the Urban Land Institute;
  • Terry Goddard, former Phoenix mayor and former Arizona attorney general who now teaches a course at the ASU Downtown Phoenix campus: “Phoenix and the Art of Public Decision Making;”
  • Taz Loomans, architect and writer/blogger on sustainability issues;
  • Kris Mayes, former commissioner of the Arizona Corporation Commission and current director of the ASU Law and Sustainability Program and professor at the ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law;
  • Andrew Ross, professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University.
  • Silvia Urrutia, director of Housing and Healthcare Finance, Raza Development Fund

According to Susan Copeland, steering committee chair of Downtown Voices Coalition, “Issues of sustainability are paramount to the future of Phoenix. Ross’ book is a great springboard from which to begin, or continue, discussion.”

The Downtown Voices Coalition is sponsoring the event with in-kind support from the Lexington Hotel in downtown Phoenix, Four Peaks Brewery of Tempe and the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center.

Bird on Fire” is available at Made Art Boutique, 922 North 5th Street in downtown Phoenix and at Changing Hands Bookstore at 6428 South McClintock Drive in Tempe. It is also available at Burton Barr, Cesar Chavez and Mesquite Branch libraries in Phoenix.

Downtown Voices Coalition is a coalition of stakeholder organizations that embrace growth in downtown Phoenix, but is mindful that healthy growth should be based upon existing downtown resources — the vibrancy of neighborhoods, the strength of the arts community, the uniqueness of historic properties, and the wonderful small businesses that dot downtown. For more information, visit downtownvoices.org.

Former A.G. and Phoenix mayor to teach ASU course in the Fall

Terry Goddard, the former Arizona Attorney General from 2003-2011 and former Mayor of Phoenix from 1984-1990, will be teaching a course at ASU’s School of Public Affairs in the Fall 2011 semester.

PAF 591 Phoenix and the Art of Public Decision Making is a new course elective for Fall 2011.
The course meets Tuesdays, 5:40-8:30 PM in UCENT 213. The class # is 88238.

The course is open to graduate students from across ASU, and also highly motivated undergraduate students. (Students in Barrett, the Honors College, may register.)

Instructor: Samuel Pearson “Terry” Goddard III was the Attorney General of Arizona, from 2003 to 2011, and also served as Mayor of Phoenix, Arizona from 1984 to 1990.

Course description: The course will provide a case history examination of efforts to include significant public participation in the major decisions facing Phoenix between 1984 and 1990. The course will examine some of the critical issues facing Phoenix 25 years ago and how public participation was encouraged and the extent to which it was achieved. In this context, participation is not defined as opposition to the latest zoning outrage or to public officials run amok, but how a city can engage large numbers of citizens as constructive players in public decisions. Phoenix during this period tried many different ways to bring the non-lobbyist public “into the room”, some successful, others not so much.

Mayor Goddard’s campaign slogan to “Open the Doors to City Hall” got the ball rolling, but how to take the Open Door concept beyond campaign rhetoric was a challenge few if any municipalities have taken so seriously. Issues to be examined include the adoption of Council districts, establishing and locating a homeless shelter, the Village Planning Process in planning and zoning, stimulating arts, culture and historic preservation, adopting a city logo, billboards and the control of visual blight, locating major entertainment venues such as Desert Sky Pavilion and the Suns Arena, and, finally, the comprehensive strategic planning process known as the Phoenix Futures Forum. During this time, thousands of nonelected volunteers took on significant responsibility for the future of their city. The class will discuss the actual impact of this involvement as well as the practical and philosophical limits to public involvement in government. Did the various programs survive to the present day? Why and why not. Today, as high expectations for government seem more and more disconnected from personal responsibility and involvement, and public confidence in governance at all levels plummets, the lessons from Phoenix in opening the door to citizen participation are particularly relevant.

For more information and to register, check the ASU catalog.

UA’s Mini Medical School Returns to downtown Phoenix

[Source: University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix]

Wednesdays February 16 & 23 March 2 & 9. 6 – 8 p.m.

The Mini-Medical School of the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix is a four-week program loosely modeled after the curriculum at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. The lectures are designed to be fun and informative. There is no late-night cramming, long exams or long hours at this school. Just bring your curiosity, sit back and enjoy!

Lecture Schedule for Spring 2011:

  • February 16: Forensics: A Visit from the Maricopa Medical Examiner by Mark Fischione, MD
  • February 23: Aging, Longevity and Health: The Current Picture and Predictions for the Future by Georgia Hall, PhD
  • March 2: Cervical Cancer Prevention and the Latest in Clinical Trial Research by Francisco Garcia, MD
  • March 9: What’s New in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery by William Leighton, MD

Courtesy: SmithGroup
Lecture topics subject to change due to availability of presenters.

Details

Location: College of Medicine-Phoenix 600 E. Van Buren St. Virginia G. Piper Auditorium (between Fifth and Seventh Streets on the north side of Van Buren)
Time: 6 – 8 p.m.
Dates: February 9 & 23 and March 2 & 9.

More Information

For more information about Mini-Medical School at the College of Medicine-Phoenix, please contact:

Barbara Quinlan, Public Affairs College of Medicine-Phoenix
550 East Van Buren Street
Phoenix, Arizona 85004
(602) 827-2024
bquinlan@email.arizona.edu

www.phoenix.medicine.arizona.edu

December College Depot Workshops for Students and Parents

[Source: City of Phoenix]

College Depot, located on the second floor of Burton Barr Central Library at 1221 N. Central Ave., will host four free workshops in English and Spanish in December.

  • Understanding Financial Aid
    Thursday, Dec. 2, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
    Learn about grants, work study, loans and scholarships.
  • No Parent Left Behind: Helping Your Students Through the College Planning Process
    Tuesday, Dec. 7, 6:00-7:00 p.m.
    Survival for you and help for your students during this transition.
  • How to Pay for College (in Spanish)
    Saturday, Dec. 11, 2:00-3:00 p.m.
    Figure out how to pay for college by exploring financial aid and scholarships.
  • Organizational Skills to Get You Through College
    Tuesday, Dec. 14, 5:00-6:15 p.m.
    Learn about goal setting, time management, study skills and note taking.

Space is limited. To register or for more information, call 602-261-8847 or e-mail college.depot@phoenix.gov.

College Depot is a full-service college planning center that offers free one-on-one assistance, family consultation and workshops on all aspects of the college planning process, from financial aid to career exploration. The service is open to anyone seeking assistance with planning for college.

For a complete list of workshops and events, visit phoenix.gov/collegedepot.

Follow on Twitter at twitter.com/CollegeDepot.

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UA’s Health Sciences Education Building under construction in downtown Phoenix

[Source: UA News]

Dr. Stuart D. Flynn, dean, UA College of Medicine–Phoenix. Photo: UANews.org

The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix began construction Friday on the Health Sciences Education Building at the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, or PBC, located at 600 E. Van Buren St.

Mayor Phil Gordon, councilman Michael Johnson and Dr. Stuart Flynn, dean of the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix, moved the first dirt in the construction of the $129 million building that will allow for the expansion of the medical education facilities.

“Even in a treacherously down economy, our city has remained committed to forging ahead when it comes to attracting bioscience research jobs, education jobs and creating new doctors who will save lives,” Gordon said.

“This building and our partnership with the University embodies the collaborative spirit that has made our success possible. When the Health Sciences building opens and we’re graduating 120 new doctors a year, we’ll look back on this day as a landmark.”

The College of Medicine-Phoenix anchors the PBC and currently hosts 168 medical students, admitting 48 per year, with the completion of this building the college will be able to grow its class size to 120 students per year to meet the demand of Arizona’s growing population.

“Today highlights the city’s commitment to building a knowledge-based economy in bioscience research and education,” Flynn said.

“Located on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, this building embodies the collaborative environment where current and future doctors will learn side-by-side with pharmacists, nurses and allied health workers to advance science and improve patient care.”

“This is an important milestone; it marks our significant effort to create jobs and build a brighter future in our community though health care and scientific education,” said Johnson, in whose district the building is located.

“Once this building is complete, all three state universities will have a presence in downtown Phoenix.”

Also on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus are the UA College of Pharmacy and the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute and International Genomics Consortium and the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative building.

DPR Construction and Sundt Construction will jointly build the new six-story, 264,000-square-foot-facility, scheduled for completion in summer 2012. The building was designed by CO Architects and Ayers Saint Gross.

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