City to use downtown Phoenix’s Rosson House to host visitors

[Source: Emily Gersema, The Arizona Republic]

 

azcentral.com

 

The historic Rosson House at Sixth and Monroe streets in downtown Phoenix’s Heritage Square has been a museum for several years, and city officials have found yet another purpose for it.

The Victorian house was recently designated a “protocol house” by the City Council. This special designation means that city officials can bring officials who are visiting Phoenix to small meetings or receptions at the house.

This is the city’s first protocol house. City leaders chose the house because it is secure, comfortable, a symbol of Phoenix history, and close to City Hall and Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Councilman Tom Simplot, who represents District 4, supports historic preservation and had been a key proponent of the protocol house idea.

“It’s a great way to leverage public and private resources,” Simplot said.

Officials have said no extra city funding is needed to use the house for this purpose.

A timeline based on Rosson House Museum information is below.

1894

The house is designed by A.P. Petit for Dr. Roland Lee Rosson, who became mayor in 1895, the year he and his wife, Flora, moved in. Construction costs $7,525.

1897

The Rossons move after selling the home to local merchant and legislator Aaron Goldberg.

1974

After the house has changed hands several times, the city buys it for $74,425. The house is designated Arizona’s Bicentennial Meeting House by the state Bicentennial Commission.

1976

The Junior League of Phoenix reaches an agreement with the city, Rosson House Restoration Board and M.M. Sundt Construction Co. to restore the home’s interior. .

1980

The house is opened to the public.

1995

The house turns 100.

2010

The house is designated as a protocol house for officials visiting from out of town.

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About Yuri Artibise

I am a community driven policy analyst, community engagement practitioner and social media specialist.

Posted on October 19, 2010, in City Hall, Downtown Vitality and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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