Blog Archives

Moonlight Movie at Steele Indian School Park on Saturday

Phoenicians are invited bring their family, friends, a blanket and a snack to join Councilman Tom Simplot for the first 2011 Moonlight Movie in the Park at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 26, at Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Road.

The evening’s presentation will be Disney-Pixar’s UP.

For more information, contact the District 4 office at 602-262-7447 or council.district.4@phoenix.gov

Want to see a Dog Park in Downtown Phoenix? Then Read This and Act!

Downtown Phoenix‘s St Croix Villas needs your help.  If you like any of the following things, you’ll want to help them:

  • Downtown Vibrancy
  • Pedestrianism
  • Community
  • Dogs

DOGS MATTER IN PHOENIX

In Phoenix the dogs to humans ratio is slightly more than one dog to every two humans — the Phoenix human population is 1,512,986 and the Phoenix dog population Is 768,000 (according to “Dog Fancy Magazine“).

There are only 5 dog parks in Phoenix. The closest one to downtown is Steele Indian School Park.  Dogs cannot travel on the Light Rail.

Information Session

The  “Ramada Inn Dog Park Endeavor”  will be discussed at Thursday’s (Oct 21st) Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition meeting. The meeting will be at 1817 N 7th St. at 7 p.m. (Phoenix Elementary School District offices, N.E. corner).

 

Public Hearing

St Croix Villas is challenging the Zoning Hearing Officer’s decision to turn the site of the historic Ramada Inn into a temporary parking lot. The “Notice of Public Hearing” for November 4th at 12:00 is attached.

Notice of Public Hearing

Petition

Here is the text of the peition that St Croix Villas is circulating.

Dog_Park_Petition (.doc)

“I, the undersigned, hereby petition the Phoenix City Council to create a public dog park on the northern half of the block formerly filled by the Ramada Inn Phoenix Downtown, a 300 ft x 300 ft property at 401 NORTH FIRST ST., PHOENIX, AZ 85004. The parking lot currently planned to fill this property will add to Phoenix’ heat island effect and will encourage more and excessive downtown automobile traffic. Our property values, and the desirability of our community, are based on both the current and potential ‘pedestrianism’ of downtown.  A new 90,000 sq. ft. parking lot is not needed and will reduce the value of our property and all downtown properties. A dog park balancing a smaller parking lot will mitigate these effects.”

If you would like to see a dog park instead of another parking lot in downtown Phoenix, please print it out and circulate it amongst your office, neighborhood,  friends and/or family.

Contact Sean SweatYuri Artibise, or the DVC to submit completed petitions


 

 

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Moonlight Movie in the Park: Wizard of Oz on October 16th

District 4 Councilperson Tom Simplot‘s Moonlight Movies in the Park program is back on October 16th!
In partnership with Cox Communications, they will be showing the all-time classic, “Wizard of Oz.”  The movie will be shown at the Steele Indian School Park amphitheater at sundown.  Steele Indian School Park is located at 300 E Indian School Rd (map).
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Tree Planting at Steele Indian School Park

[Source: HandsOn Greater Phoenix]

Photo credite: Daniel Greene on Flickr

Calling all green thumbs and tree-huggers! Join us for a morning of environmental action as we plant trees and revitalize one of Phoenix’s best-known parks. Please wear clothing you don’t mind getting dirty and closed-toed shoes. Remember to bring a water bottle and sunscreen!

The minimum age for this project is 8 with an accompanying adult. Volunteers ages 16 and 17 who wish to participate without an accompanying adult must bring a signed Youth Volunteer Waiver. Please download the waiver from the “Youth Volunteer” link on the website’s menu.

By signing up for projects and not attending, you may be depriving someone else of the opportunity to participate and the project of much-needed support.

Please note that in an effort to accommodate volunteers who sign up for projects by choice, HandsOn does not accept court ordered volunteers and will not sign off on any court-related documents.

You must register to participate.

Details:

Saturday, September 11, 2010
7:00AM – 10:00AM
Location: Phoenix, AZ 85015
The full project address and directions will be sent to you by e-mail after you sign up.
Accommodations for volunteers with disabilities:You will have the opportunity to request accommodations after you sign up for this project.

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Fourth of July fireworks in central Phoenix

When: Saturday, July 4, 2009

Time:  6 p.m. – 10 p.m.  Fireworks begin approximately 9:20 p.m.

Place: Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Rd.

Cost: Admission is free.  Food and beverages available for purchase.

For more information, click here.

1902 Dining Hall next rehab project at Steele Indian School Park

Dining Hall, Steele Indian School Park (photo: phxpma)

[Source: Barbara Stocklin, City of Phoenix] — Exterior abatement work is currently underway on the 1902 Dining Hall at Steele Indian School Park.  Lead paint from the exterior brick and wood surfaces are currently being removed using hand tools (to ensure that the soft historic brick is not damaged).  The exterior rehabilitation project includes roof repair and replacement, exterior brick repairs, window and door restoration, and other miscellaneous exterior work items.  Additional funds are needed to address the interiors and for the building to accommodate a new use.

The exterior rehabilitation project, funded with 2006 Historic Preservation Bond funds and Native American gaming monies, is slated to be completed in late spring 2009. Brycon, the contractor for Dining Hall, is also set to begin work within the next few weeks on the exterior rehabilitation of the adjacent 1932 Grammar School/Band Building.  [Note: For more information about the city’s historic preservation program, click here.]

Phoenix’s 1922 Memorial Hall renovated and reopened

[Source: Nicole McGregor, 12 News Today] — An historic part of Phoenix opens to the public this week.  Memorial Hall was part of the Phoenix Indian School when it began in 1922. Closed in the early 90’s, it sat in disarray, until now.  The $5 million project was not a small undertaking; most of the funding came from bonds passed in 2001 and 2006. The idea was to renovate it, not re-do it.  The goal was to retain much of the integrity of the building.  The original wood floors remain and so do about 40 percent of the ceiling tiles.  Even the same bricks can be seen on the outside where students once carved their names.

Back in the 20’s the Memorial Hall was used for graduation, recitals and assemblies for the school. Regional Park Manager Dorothy Blakely says it is just one of three buildings which still stand at Steele Indian School Park.  The other two, the dining hall and elementary/band building will also be renovated, but only on the outside.  Memorial Hall will be available for rent and used for a musical venue when opportunities arise.   Call 602-534-8198 if you’re interested.  The grand opening is this week.  It’s open for public tours Wednesday, October 29 starting at 6:30 p.m.   (Click here for video.)

[Source: Betty Reid, Arizona Republic] — About 200 people attended the grand opening of the restored Memorial Hall at Steele Indian School Park in central Phoenix on Wednesday night.   It cost nearly $5 million and took two years to restore the building.  The auditorium, which seats 350, is part of the old Phoenix Indian School property.   It was built in 1922 and named to honor those who served during World War I.

$300 million recommended to spend on Phoenix parks, land

Rendering of Downtown Civic Space, Phoenix

[Source: Casey Newton, Arizona Republic] — City officials will spend nearly $300 million on land acquisition and park development in the next five years under a proposal recommended recently by the Parks and Recreation Board. The funds, which come from voters’ extension of the Parks and Preserve Initiative earlier this year, will be split almost evenly between acquiring preserve land and developing and improving parks.

Parks due to see funding from the initiative’s passage include:

  • Downtown Civic Space
  • Steele Indian School Park
  • Papago Park
  • Phoenix Zoo
  • Reach 11 Recreation Area
  • Rose Mofford Sports Complex
  • Unnamed park at 51st and Sweetwater avenues

The parks board recommends eliminating a $2 million appropriation for acquisition of Pioneer Living History Village in far north Phoenix. [Note: To read the full article, click here.]

Grand opening set for Phoenix Steele Indian School Park’s restored Memorial Hall

Memorial Hall built in 1922 as it is todayThe city of Phoenix will celebrate the grand opening of the newly restored Memorial Hall at Steele Indian School Park on Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m.  Memorial Hall is one of three buildings remaining at the park from the Phoenix Indian School, a federally run school for Native Americans that previously occupied the site of the park.  The grand opening celebration will open with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 6 p.m., followed by self-guided tours from 6:45 to 7:15 and performances by the Phoenix Boys Choir, Phoenix Chorale, and other local musicians at 7:30 that will showcase the hall’s acoustics.  All events are free and open to the public.

After its opening, Memorial Hall will be available for rent as a space for musical performances, special arts presentations, and community meetings.  Originally designed as a musical performance space, the Hall is uniquely suited for choral and musical presentations.  Detailed facility and rental information is available online on the Arts, Culture, and History page of the Parks and Recreation Department website.  The Hall’s renovation recently earned the Valley Forward Crescordia Award for Historic Preservation for 2008.

Memorial Hall, a two-story Mission Revival style building, was constructed in 1922.  The school used it for general assemblies, graduation ceremonies, and theatrical activities.  In the 1930s, students began carving their names in the red brick outside the main entrance, a tradition that students continued over the ensuing decades.  Because the buildings red brick exterior was preserved, those carved names are still visible.  To this day, former students of the school return to the site to find the names they carved decades earlier.

During rehabilitation, the original building fabric was restored to preserve as much of the structure as possible and reduce the need for new materials and increased landfill waste. The original maple floor was refinished and reinstalled, most of the windows were rehabilitated rather than replaced, saving the original wood that was used to make them in 1922, and the standards for the chairs on the balcony level were all reused in the restoration of the seating.  Although many of the tin ceiling panels had been damaged when heating and air conditioning duct work was put in place after the 1940s, many of the stunning ceiling tiles were salvaged in the restoration.  Great care was taken in planning the new heating, cooling, and ventilation system for the building.  A central plant was installed, ductwork was concealed under the crawlspace and in the attic to minimize detrimental effects to the historic character, and insulation was added under the floor and in the attic to improve energy efficiency.  New electrical and plumbing systems were designed with energy efficient lighting, low flow fixtures, and state of the art control systems to reduce long term energy consumption.  The restoration cost just under $5 million, 75% of which came from 2001 and 2006 bonds. The remaining funding came from grants from the National Park Service and the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust.

Tour Phoenix’s rehabbed historic Memorial Hall, Oct. 29

[Source: Barbara Stocklin, City of Phoenix] — Join the City of Phoenix in celebrating the 6 p.m. ribbon cutting for the grand opening of the newly rehabilitated 1922 Memorial Hall, Wednesday, October 29, 2008.  Tours of the historic building will be held from 6:45 to 7:15 p.m. and, at 7:30 p.m., enjoy musical performances by local entertainers.  Location: Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Rd.