Blog Archives

7th Ave. and McDowell: the gateway to downtown Phoenix

[Source: Si Robins, Downtown Phoenix Journal] — The intersection of 7th Avenue and McDowell has long been overlooked.  Before SideBar, Pei Wei, and Starbucks moved onto the southwest corner of the intersection, it was an all-but-forgotten red light stop — abandoned antique shops, boarded storefronts, and a gas station.  So many ventures have come and gone on the corner that even the real estate boom of the early 2000s couldn’t lift it out of its hole.  But, things are turning around.

Whether or not you’re ready to admit it, the corner is quietly becoming an important gateway to Downtown from Midtown neighborhoods and points west.  Those invested in the corner couldn’t agree more.  “There are great neighborhoods around it — they’re diverse; they’ve been here forever,” says Josh Parry, co-owner of SideBar, which just celebrated its first anniversary.  “We’ve got walk-up traffic and a really diverse group of people.   This corner has amazing potential.  It’s got everything going for it, but it’s just been ignored by everyone for so long.”

Mike Hogarty, a partner at Desert Viking, the development company rehabbing the southeast corner of the intersection, concurs.  “It’s the four corners of the historic neighborhoods (Willo, F.Q. Story, Roosevelt and Encanto-Palmcroft),” Hogarty says.  “It’s always been a good corner; it’s just been poorly served recently, and it’s time to change that.”  [Note: To read the full article, visit 7th Ave. and McDowell: the gateway to downtown Phoenix.]

Talton offers alternative view on downtown Phoenix Civic Space

[Source: John Talton, Rogue Columnist] — Former Arizona Republic columnist Jon Talton still thinks and writes about his old hometown, Phoenix.  Upon returning to his current home from a recent visit and book signing tour in Arizona, Jon wrote the following blog post about the new downtown Phoenix Civic Space (in contrast to this other local blogger’s view):

“…Which brings me to the Floating Diaphragm.  That’s what local wags have dubbed the “public art” project that is the signature of the new park on Central Avenue downtown between ASU and the Y.  At night, it’s stunning.  A floating purple dream.  But, as with the Sandra Day O’Connor Federal Courthouse, this is something designed by someone with no knowledge of local conditions.  After the first big monsoon, look for the diaphragm in your neighborhood — Gilbert would be appropriate, with its sex phobia and sex scandals. 

The park — we’ll see.  Phoenix is not good at civic spaces.  It’s unclear if it will have enough shade and grass to be inviting year-round.  And nobody can stop the creeping gravelization of the once-oasis central city.  City Hall sets a terrible example.  The old Willo House has been spiffed up as Hob Nobs.  But it’s surrounded by gravel and a couple of fake palm trees — who wouldn’t want to be around that 140-dgree heat surface on a summer day? And there are more of them — the natives and long-timers agree the falls and springs have shrunk to a week or two, and winter is getting shorter (and it lacks the frosts that once kept the mosquito population in check).  The central city needs lots of shade trees and grass, to offset the heat island effect.  It is a much better water investment than new golf courses or more sprawl.  Nobody’s listening.  Almost: The Park Central Starbucks has made its outdoor space even more lush, shady, and comfy. 

Back to the diaphragm.  It’s definitely better than the “public art” you whiz by at Sky Harbor because it focuses a civic space, the kind of walkable, gathering places great cities have and Phoenix mostly lacks.  Some art at the light-rail stations is quite well done.  But, there’s a deadening sameness.  My friend, the Famous Architect, likes to rib me, “Not everything old is good.”  True enough. But not everything new is good, either.  I’d love to see some classical statues and artwork downtown to, say, commemorate the heroic pioneer farmers, the heroic, displaced indigenous peoples, the heroic Mexican-Americans, the heroic African-Americans from this once very Southern town and the heroic Chinese-Americans.  Just two or three would offer some contrast and variety, and, I suspect, unsophisticated oaf that I am, elevate and inspire more souls who communed with them.  It would also give the lie, in visual form, to the newcomer lie that “there’s no history here.” 

Another wish I won’t get.  [Note: To read the full blog posting, click here.]

Central Phoenix vortex of Arizona House Democratic leadership

Starbucks, Park Central Mall

[Source: Arizona Republic] — Arizona is the nation’s 6th largest state.  It sprawls across more than 110,000 square miles, from the farm fields of Yuma to the desert sands to the Coconino high country.  So The Insider thought it interesting that House Democrats chose to represent that vast geographic diversity by picking a leadership team composed of three lawmakers who live so close to each other that they probably frequent the same Starbucks.  And that’s saying something.

The incoming team of House Minority Leader David Lujan, Assistant Minority Leader Kyrsten Sinema, and Minority Whip Chad Campbell live in a central Phoenix neighborhood basically bordered by Camelback on the north and Roosevelt on the south, between Seventh Avenue and Seventh Street.  But Sinema swore that she and the other newly minted Dem leaders would have no trouble keeping the concerns of rural Arizonans close at heart during budget talks and other negotiations.

Why?  Well, for one, Sinema noted that she was born and raised in Tucson, and Campbell attended school in Flagstaff at Northern Arizona University. Besides that, the leadership team has agreed to take on one lawmaker from rural Arizona and another from southern Arizona who’ll serve as “close advisers and assistants.”  They’ve also already agreed to take a day trip to Tucson later this month to meet with local officials, with a subsequent trip planned to Yuma.

That’s all well and good, but Arizona’s Rural vs. Urban, Maricopa vs. Everyone Else tensions run deep.  The Insider bets it won’t take long before a rural Dem wonders aloud if the Central Phoenix Trio knows a latte from a lettuce head.

Phoenix spared (so far) from Starbucks closures

Starbucks has not identified which 600 stores it plans to close between now and March 2009, but the news is “filtering” through baristas, the press, and others.  If you know of a Starbucks that’s closing, let the Seattle Times know (as they’re compiling a nationwide Google map).  And for coffee alternatives in our fair city and state, click here.

July 19 update: The Starbucks in Eloy, AZ is set to close.  Details here.

A fan of Copper Square

This twenty-something and his dad visit Arizona Center and Starbucks…and spot a hawk.  Awesome!