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Renovated, relocated Morin House now houses downtown Phoenix office

Dan Klocke

Dan Klocke in front of renovated (and moved) Morin House (photo: Michael Schennum, Arizona Republic)

[Source: Jahna Berry, Arizona Republic] — The newly restored 100-year-old Morin House is standing tall in a new neighborhood.  Two years ago, Phoenix resident Dan Klocke put the historic house on the back of a flatbed truck to prevent developers from tearing it down.  After more than $900,000 in renovations, the building is now an insurance office.  It sits on a bustling downtown Phoenix block with restaurants, apartments and businesses.  “This (project) is preserving some important history in Phoenix, filling in a gap in the neighborhood and bringing some life into Phoenix,” Klocke said.

The renovated house got its first tenant, a regional Aflac office, in May. The milestone caps a two-year odyssey for the 1909 building.  The two-story brick home originally stood at 1115 N. Second St., and was once owned by M. Edward Morin, owner of the Phoenix Bottling Works, a major employer at the time. The house’s former owners opposed the city’s 2004 effort to put the property on the city’s historic register.  Later, they made plans to put the house up for sale and asked the city for a demolition permit. But the owners also were willing to give the house away to anyone who wanted it. “So I got the house for free, but it wasn’t free to move it,” Klocke said with a laugh. [Note: To read the full article, click here.  To view a slide show on the building’s move, click here.]

Celebrate the 100 year anniversary of Phoenix’s Morin House, April 29

azpreservation

Morin House in its original location.

Come celebrate the 100th anniversary of the M. Edward Morin House, Wednesday, April 29, 2009:

  • Open House ~ 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Short Program ~ 6 p.m.

Originally located at 1115 N. 2nd St. in the Evans Churchill neighborhood, this threatened historic structure was moved through the streets of downtown Phoenix during the wee hours of September 8, 2007 to its current Roosevelt neighborhood location.  Owner Dan Klocke has rehabilitated the structure to its former glory as office space, and he invites you to see the final product.

RSVP here.

Project Description

The M. Edward Morin House was built in 1909 and is one of a handful of two story brick homes from that era in all of Phoenix.  Morin and his wife D’Etta were the owners of the Phoenix Bottling Works at the turn of the last century and built the home as a testament to their hard work.  The 2.000 square foot house employs a unique blend of Queen Anne massinq, featurinq an octagonal projection at the south end, with Colonial Revival ornamentation, including a classical entablature supported by Ionic columns.  Craftsmen details are also present, such as overhanqinq eaves with exposed rafter ends.

The property was a sinqle family home until the late 1930’s, served as an apartment for many years, and until recently was an office and home to Orcutt Winslow Architects.  Threatened with demolition, the current owner moved the house from 2nd Street and Moreland to its current site.

While all of the floors, windows, and character pieces have been restored, the electrical, plumbing, and HVAC systems are all brand new. The first floor has restored leaded glass windows and woodwork in the lobby, front room, and large back room, complete with massive pocket doors.

National Trust officials tour Valley for possible 2012 conference

Kathy Adams and Lori Feinman of the National Trust for Historic Preservation flew into town last week to view Phoenix’s convention facilities; tour selected historic sites and neighborhoods in Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Tempe; and visit with area preservation advocates to determine Phoenix’s ability to host the 2012 National Preservation Conference.  Meeting them at Sky Harbor was Sally Forrest, National Accounts Director for the Greater Phoenix Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Phoenix Councilman Michael Nowakowski welcomes National Trust representatives Lori Feinman and Kathy Adams. (Photo: Midtown Messenger)

The three lunched at the Hotel Valley Ho, one of the National Trust’s Historic Hotels of America, and then drove to downtown Phoenix to tour the Phoenix Convention Center, the Hyatt Regency and Wyndham hotels (two of the host hotels), and Orpheum Theatre. Barbara Stocklin, City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Officer, and Jim McPherson, Arizona Advisor to the National Trust, joined them for dinner at the Rose & Crown Pub in Heritage Square Park (a large outdoor venue that could serve as the opening reception for the 2,500-plus attendees of the 2012 conference).

Phoenix's historic Ellis Shackelford House was decked out in the colors of Arizona's state flag. (Photo: Midtown Messenger)

On Tuesday, Adams and Feinman started off the day by visiting the historic San Carlos Hotel and breakfast at Palette in the Roosevelt Historic District.  Then it was a “timed-to-the minute” whirlwind van tour of First Presbyterian Church, Security Building (and ASU’s PURL overlooking the city), Monroe School (Children’s Museum of Phoenix), Phoenix Union High School Buildings (University of Arizona College of Medicine), Steele Indian School Park, Heard Museum, and several midtown residential historic districts.

State Historic Preservation Officer Jim Garrison and Modern Phoenix Founder Alison King joined the group for lunch and tour of the Arizona Biltmore Resort and Spa.  Then it was off to drive by the Wrigley Mansion, and visit the Desert Botanical Garden, Gammage Auditorium, Pueblo Grande National Historic Landmark, and St. Mary’s Basilica.  Special guests “popped in” throughout the day to say hello, provide their perspective on preservation, and tout Phoenix as a conference site: Attorney General Terry Goddard (Palette), State Senator Debbie McCune Davis (UA College of Medicine), City of Phoenix Council Member Greg Stanton (Children’s Museum), attorney Grady Gammage (Gammage Auditorium), former Phoenix mayor John Driggs, and Arizona 2012 Centennial director Karen Churchard.

Dan Klocke (Downtown Phoenix Partnership), Charles Fortenberry (Southwest Association of Buffalo Soldiers), John Jacquemart (Arizona Historic Sites Review Committee), and G.G. George (Encanto Citizens Association). (Photo: Midtown Messenger)

Topping off the visit was a reception at the Ellis Shackelford House in downtown Phoenix.  Over 60 preservation advocates from all over the Valley (and Sierra Vista!), city officials, and downtown business group leaders attended.  A balloon arch, special signage, decorations, and flowers in the colors of Arizona’s state flag welcomed our guests from the National Trust.  City of Phoenix Council Member Michael Nowakowski, Garrison, Stocklin, Feinman, and McPherson said a few words, and the rest of the evening was spent enjoying each other’s company and dining on wonderful hors d’oeuvres from Catered by St. Joseph’s.  Gift bags courtesy of the State Historic Preservation Office and City of Phoenix were presented to Adams and Feinman, and each attendee received a small gift as well.