Blog Archives

Civic Space Park brings feel of small neighborhood park to heart of downtown Phoenix

Yuri Artibise alerted us of this article that appeared in the Next American City blog on the Civic Space Park:

What did Civic Space Park bring to downtown Phoenix that wasn’t there before?
Civic Space Park brought the feel of a small neighborhood park to the heart of downtown Phoenix in a space that was formerly a collection of old buildings and parking lots. It gives emerging artists and performers a venue to showcase their talents and abilities.  It is a place that families can come to enjoy free events while keeping kids occupied with the splash pad and green grass to run and play in.  The newly renovated A.E. England Building houses the Fair Trade Cafe and offers space for meetings, banquets, classes, offices and art events. One of the goals of the park was to keep every event that takes place to remain free and open to the public.

Read more here.

And congratulations to the Civic Space Park Collaborative for being a Silver Medalist for the Rudy Bruner Award!

FREE Regional Tree & Shade Summit in Downtown Phoenix on Wednesday

Growing Connections: Roots to Branches

Arizona and its communities face challenging problems with diminishing resources. How do communities do more with less? Green Infrastructure is a solution multiplier that provides cost effective solutions to many economic, social and environmental problems. All Arizona communities and businesses have a role in cultivating a healthier, more livable and prosperous future.

Presentations and a Discussion on Cultivating Green Infrastructure

The Regional Tree & Shade Summit will bring together municipal and private sector professionals for a one-day meeting to address the growing importance of regional tree and shade plans and green infrastructure to the long-term sustainability and success of our communities.

Details

Date

Wednesday, March 9, 2011
8:30am – 5:00pm

Location

A.E. England Building @ Civic Space Park
424 N. Central Ave, Downtown Phoenix

Adjacent to Downtown Phoenix Central Station. Light Rail Use Strongly Encouraged

RSVP

Space is Limited: Register at http://sustainablecities.asu.edu

More information

If you have any questions, please contact Anne Reichman at anne.reichman@asu.edu or call 480-965-2168.

Sponsors

This event is brought to you by: 

  • Arizona Forestry
  • ASU Global Institute of Sustainability
  • City of Glendale
  • City of Phoenix
  • City of Mesa
  • US Department of Agriculture Forestry Service

Downtown Phoenix Park is a Finalist for National Award

[Source: Cassie StraussDowntown Devil]

Civic Space Park one of five finalists for national urban excellence award

Cassie Strauss/DD

Civic Space Park in downtown Phoenix is one of five finalists for the Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, a recognition given every other year for urban spaces that contribute to their community.

A team of three judges visited Phoenix this past week to evaluate the park and its impact on downtown Phoenix. At an interview luncheon Tuesday, members of the community gathered to present their case. Among those speaking were community volunteers, performers who use the park, members of arts groups, a police officer, and some of the men and women who collaborated to create Civic Space.

All attending spoke in favor of the park’s versatile spaces, safety record and, most importantly, tolerance of the area’s inhabitants, who include many homeless and mentally ill. The nearby Westward Ho building is a low-income housing center for the elderly and many residents frequent the park.

ASU’s liaison to the park, Malissa Geer, explained that diversity makes the park what it is.

The rich social fabric is a necessary “learning experience for students to learn that safety does not equal homogeneity,” she said. “To learn that safety is not just ‘these people look like me.’”

As a large presence in the downtown area, the university needs to “break the fear” that pervades the perception of the neighborhoods surrounding the Downtown campus, Geer said. Safety is often not the true issue. The homeless are rarely dangerous, but rather, make other citizens — including many students — simply uncomfortable, she said.

Cmdr. Richard Wilson, the police officer who spoke at the interview, said that many students and parents question the safety of the park, but in reality there is little danger.

“I had one parent say to me, ‘My daughter saw a homeless person. What are you going to do about it?’” he said. “The fact is, this is a benign population. If you ask them why they’re here, they say, ‘Because I feel safe.’”

Geer said it’s important to activate the park — to raise the number of people using the park on a daily basis. The park is one of just a few in Phoenix with a security presence, and not only can the park be a beautiful place to visit, but a necessary encounter with urban living, Geer said.

“We want our students to actually understand diversity,” she said. “How can we displace the homeless and train social workers at the same time?”

The award for urban excellence measures, among other things, the impact on the community. One way that impact is shown is through inclusion of all facets of the population.

Already the park has garnered a $10,000 prize for being a silver finalist, and if selected for the gold it will receive a total of $50,000.

Other finalists include The Bridge Homeless Assistance Center in Dallas, Brooklyn Bridge Park in Brooklyn, the Gary Comer Youth Center in Chicago and the Santa Fe Railyard Redevelopment. Civic Space is the only project this year that is technically a city park.

The 2009 winner was Inner-City Arts of Los Angeles, an organization that services youth in the city’s Skid Row area by providing art instruction and education.

Contact the reporter at clstraus@asu.edu